2024 : 6 : 14
Shirin Abadikhah

Shirin Abadikhah

Academic rank: Assistant Professor
ORCID:
Education: PhD.
ScopusId:
Faculty: Department of literature
Address: Department of English Language and Literature; Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences; University of Mazandaran; Shahid Beheshti Street 47415 P.O Box 416; Babolsar; Iran.
Phone: 01135302673

Research

Title
Iraqi High School Students’ Perceptions toward Peer-peer Feedback and Teacher Feedback in Writing
Type
Thesis
Keywords
Feedback, Peer-peer Feedback, Perception, Teacher Feedback, Writing
Year
2022
Researchers Somaye Abd Alsada Mohammed(Student)، Fatemeh Khonamri(Advisor)، Shirin Abadikhah(PrimaryAdvisor)

Abstract

In the Iraqi English as a foreign language (EFL) context, teachers' feedback is highly preferred by EFL learners; however, excessive dependence on it, add to teachers' work load. Therefore, teachers are increasingly searching for alternative methods such as peer-peer feedback, which is gradually gaining importance. The current research aims to investigate Iraqi EFL learners' perceptions toward peer-peer feedback and teacher feedback. A survey questionnaire was administered to the participants in order to collect the relevant data. The total number of the participants was 80 EFL Iraqi students comprising forty female students from Damascus high school and forty male students from Al-Hassan high school. Findings indicated that the majority of students affirmed that it was extremely significant that teachers provide comments on all four writing aspects. Furthermore, the results confirm Iraqi EFL students' inclination toward meaning-focused (i.e. content and organization) rather than form-focused (vocabulary and grammar) feedback from their teachers. Concerning the participants' responses to peer-peer feedback, the majority of students confirmed that it is extremely important that the peers receive training on how to give comments on language aspects. However, they mostly agreed on receiving written corrective feedback from their more knowledgeable peers. Finally, results of a t-test analysis revealed that there was a significant difference between the participants' responses on teacher feedback and that on peer feedback, suggesting that they preferred teacher feedback over peer feedback. The results of this study have implications for English language teachers and students, suggesting that a combination of teacher and more knowledgeable peer feedback should be employed in classroom practice and if peers are to provide feedback, they should be provided with training sessions on how to provide feedback to their peers